Library Websites for the Top 100 Universities

Duke University Libraries

Sometimes, when evaluating your library’s website or services, you’d like to see how things are done at other institutions.  Why reinvent the wheel?  Maybe you just need some inspiration; seeing another’s layout or reading alternative wording can spark a brilliant idea.  Or you might just copy something that works.

U. S. News & World Report’s Best CollegesIf you find yourself wanting to browse other academic websites but don’t know where to start or how to choose them, this list of links can help.  This is not a list of the top 100 academic library websites.  Rather, it is a list of the library websites for the top 100 institutions in the U. S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges National University Rankings.  Use it to check a handful of sites or all 100.

Library Website Links

American University

Baylor University

Binghamton University

Boston College

Boston University

Brandeis University

Brigham Young University

Brown University

California Institute of Technology

Carnegie Mellon University

Case Western Reserve University

Clark University

Clemson University

College of Environmental Science and Forestry

College of William and Mary

Colorado School of Mines

Columbia University

Cornell University

Dartmouth College

Drexel University

Duke University

Emory University

Florida State University

Fordham University

George Washington University

Georgetown University

Georgia Institute of Technology

Harvard University

Indiana University Bloomington

Johns Hopkins University

Lehigh University

Marquette University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Miami University

Michigan State University

New York University

North Carolina State University

Northeastern University

Northwestern University

Ohio State University

Pennsylvania State University

Pepperdine University

Princeton University

Purdue University

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Rice University

Rochester Institute of Technology

Rutgers University

Saint Louis University

Southern Methodist University

Stanford University

Stevens Institute of Technology

Stony Brook University

Syracuse University

Texas A&M University

Texas Christian University

Tufts University

Tulane University

University at Buffalo

University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Davis

University of California, Irvine

University of California, Los Angeles

University of California, San Diego

University of California, Santa Barbara

University of California, Santa Cruz

University of Chicago

University of Colorado Boulder

University of Connecticut

University of Delaware

University of Denver

University of Florida

University of Georgia

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Iowa

University of Maryland

University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Miami

University of Michigan

University of Minnesota

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of Notre Dame

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pittsburgh

University of Rochester

University of San Diego

University of Southern California

University of Texas at Austin

University of Tulsa

University of Virginia

University of Washington

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Vanderbilt University

Villanova University

Virginia Tech

Wake Forest University

Washington University in St. Louis

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Yale University

Yeshiva University

Open Access Week 2017

Open Access Week

International Open Access Week runs from October 23–29, 2017.  For all of the details, visit www.openaccessweek.org.

This year’s theme is “Open in order to:” with a blank line to highlight what open access enables your library or institution to do.

Open Access Week 2017

Open in order to:

Your library or institution is probably utilizing open access resources.  For Open Access Week this year, promote them to show how they can benefit your users.  Here are just a few of the ways.

Promote Institutional Repositories

Many institutions are publishing open access resources in institutional repositories, often administered by library staff.  Whether using paid proprietary platforms such as bepress’s Digital Commons or open source products CONTENTdm, DSpace, and Omeka, institutions can publish open access scholarly articles, journals, books, and data.

Does your institution have an institutional repository?  If so, promote it to your users—both creators and consumers.  Show faculty and staff how they can extend the reach of their published research and increase citation counts.  Teach users to find relevant open access resources written by their own professors and others in their field.

Also, help scholars extend their reach by helping them register for an ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID), a unique 16-digit number which distinguishes them from other researchers in online resources.

Extend Electronic Resources Budgets

We all subscribe to must-have research databases.  But as subscription prices rise and library budgets are stretched thin, supplementing your list of paid databases with free, open access databases and journals makes sense.  Important scholarly works are now being published exclusively in major open access databases such as arXiv, HathiTrust Digital Library, and PLOS ONE.

Increasingly, traditional publishers and database vendors are joining the trend of open access and providing some free content.  Even if you don’t subscribe to their paid content, you can link to open access from publishers and databases.

Offer Free Textbooks and Other Educational Resources

Along with higher journal and database costs, students and libraries are faced with increasing costs of textbooks.  Librarians have led the push towards expanding the use of open educational resources (OER).  Encourage your faculty and staff to use open access textbooks when possible.

Learn More

Visit the Official Site

Visit the official Open Access Week website to see 2017 events and read their blogs to learn about what others are doing.  Download resources & media such as posters, handouts, stickers, and logos to promote the event.

TwitterFollow on Social Media

Follow and use the Twitter hashtags #OAWeek and #OpenInOrderTo.

 

Past Open Access Weeks

Get more ideas from our previous Open Access Week 2016 and Open Access Week 2015 articles.

Open Access from Publishers and Databases

Open Access LogoThe movement toward open access databases and journals hasn’t been lost on traditional publishers and database vendors.

One problem for startup open access journals is their lack of reputation and prestige due to their inherent newness.  They have no established reputation or credibility except that of the sponsoring organization: an academic society, institution, or university.  Established traditional publishers can somewhat overcome this problem by lending their name, reputation, and credibility to their journals.

More and more traditional publishers are experimenting with the open access journal publishing model.  Very few journals are converted from the traditional subscription model to open access, most are new journals developed as open access from the start.

Generally, the publishers are separating their open access journals from their subscription journals and creating new databases to aggregate and provide access to them.  Database vendors may integrate subscription and open access journals with a search filter for open access titles.

Here are some major publishers and databases and their current open access offerings.

Elsevier

ElsevierGiant academic publishing company Elsevier offers over 550 peer-reviews open access journals published under the gold open access model.  In addition, Elsevier provides free access to archived material in more than 100 paid Elsevier journals.

See Elsevier Open Access Journals.

JSTOR

JSTORJSTOR, a database of journals and ebooks, offers over 500 open access ebooks with no restrictions on chapter downloading or printing.  Librarians can access free MARC records for these titles.

See about.jstor.org/open-access.

ProQuest

PQDT OpenProQuest doesn’t generally support open access.  It does offer one service, called PQDT Open, providing open access dissertations and theses.  Graduate students pay a one-time fee of $95 through the Open Access Publishing PLUS service.

See and search PQDT Open.

SAGE Open

SAGE OpenSAGE Open is a peer-reviewed open access journal from SAGE Publications.  Coverage spans “the full extent of the social and behavioral sciences and the humanities”. The publishing fee is $395.

See sgo.sagepub.com.

SpringerOpen

SpringerOpenSpringerOpen contains “200+ peer-reviewed fully open access journals” and an interdisciplinary open access journal titled SpringerPlus.  Most of the journals are indexed in Scopus and some SpringerOpen titles are searchable in Web of Science.

Authors pay “an article-processing charge (APC)” to get articles published in SpringerOpen.

See www.springeropen.com/journals.

Wiley Open Access

Wiley Open AccessWiley Open access offers 80+ open access journals.  It is a subset of Wiley Online Library.  Journal articles are accessible at PubMed Central.

Wiley also offers the partially-open access platform OnlineOpen with over 1,300 journals with a mix of pay and OA articles.

Wiley charges an Article Publication Charge (typically $800-$2,500) to authors or their institutions.  Authors can choose the type of Creative Commons license to publish under.

See www.wileyopenaccess.com.

Library Technology at the ALA 2017 Annual Conference

ALA 2017 Annual Conference

The ALA 2017 Annual Conference is just one week away.  The conference covers a myriad of library topics and sorting through the program sessions to find the ones focused on library technology takes effort.  Let us do the work for you.

Here is our list of programs related to library technology.  You’ll find interest groups and sessions on data and metadata, makerspaces, UX, Linked Data, ILS and LMS, websites, mobile apps, emerging technologies, and more.  Committee meetings were not included.

For official descriptions, speakers, and final schedule, please check the conference Full Schedule page.
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6 More Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs

Google ChromeA look at global browser market share data will show that Google’s Chrome browser commands more than half of the browser market (61.2% for April 2017, to be specific). The market share might be even higher among librarians (who have a choice at work). If you’re not a Google Chrome user, these additional six browser extensions might make you switch.

We previously posted 6 Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs.

If you’ve never considered browser extensions, they are plugins or small applications that add functionality to your browser.  Sometimes they work in the background (like Unpaywall, below) but usually they work when you click on a small icon that gets added to the browser’s toolbar.

Chrome browser extension icons

Google has a huge Chrome Web Store for browser extensions, most of them are free.  They offer help to install and manage extensions but for the most part, a single click will install an extension.  Sometimes additional configuration options are available.

Here are six more Chrome browser extensions every librarian needs.

Continue reading “6 More Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs”