Common Library Technology Acronyms Part 4

These acronyms have been added to the Library Technology Acronyms page, a dictionary of library technology terms.

ASCII – American Standard Code for Information Interchange, a standard set of text characters and encoding scheme (also called US-ASCII). (See also UTF-8.)

Creative Common

CC BY – Creative Commons Attribution, a copyright license that allows for the copy, redistribution, remix, and transformation of materials if attributed. Now at version 4.0.

CC BY-NC – Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial, a copyright license that allows for the copy, redistribution, remix, and transformation of materials if attributed for non-commercial purposes.

CC BY-NC-ND – Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives, a copyright license that allows for the copy and redistribution (but not remix and transformation) if attributed for non-commercial purposes.

CC BY-NC-SA – Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike, a copyright license that is similar to CC BY-NC except that you must share your material with the same license as the original.

CC BY-ND – Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives, a copyright license that allows for the copy and redistribution if not modified and if attributed, even for commercial purposes.

CC BY-SA – Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike, a copyright license that is similar to CC BY except that you must share your material with the same license as the original.

CLOCKSS – Controlled CLOCKS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe), an archive for long-term preservation of scholarly materials.

CMS – Content Management System or Course Management Software.

DCMI – Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, a project to develop “specifications and metadata terms namespaces”.

EOD – Embedded Order Data.

ETD – Electronic Theses and Dissertations.

FTP – File Transfer Protocol, a method of uploading and downloading files from a remote server usually using an FTP client. (See also SFTP.)

GUI – Graphical User Interface, a general term for a Web or application interface that displays graphics or images used for interaction.

KBART – Knowledge Bases and Related Tools, a NISO Recommended Practice aimed towards content providers (ex. database vendors) to make their content more accessible to discovery services.

LCSH – Library of Congress Subject Headings, a Library of Congress controlled vocabulary used as an authority file for cataloging.

LTI – Learning Tools Interoperability, a standard created by the IMS Global Learning Consortium that connects a learning management system (LMS) with external service tools.

MeSH– Medical Subject Headings, a US National Library of Medicine (NLM) controlled vocabulary used as an authority file for cataloging.

NISO – National Information Standards Organization, a US-based publisher of technical standards including OpenURL, SUSHI, Z39.50, and Recommended Practices such as the Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) and KBART.

RFP – Request for Proposal.

SFTP – SSH File Transfer Protocol or Secure File Transfer Protocol, a secure method of uploading and downloading files from a remote server usually using an FTP client. (See also FTP.)

SOAP – Simple Object Access Protocol, an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard of a Web services access protocol that uses XML, originally developed by Microsoft.

SQL – Structured Query Language, an ISO standard language used to retrieve or change data in a database, often used within an ILS to run reports.

TSV – Tab-Separated Values, data items in a table record consisting of one or more fields, separated by tabs (so the data can contain commas). (See also CSV.)

UTF-8 – Unicode Transformation Format 8-bit, a Unicode Standard text character set now used across the Internet and for MARC 21 cataloging, an extension of ASCII.

2019 Library Conference Schedule

It’s a new year and we are looking forward to the 2019 annual library conferences. The list below covers large library technology conferences as well as the major conferences where technology will be discussed.

January #hashtag
25-29 ALA Midwinter Meeting, Seattle, WA #alamw19
February
19-22 Code4Lib 2019, San José, CA #c4l19
March
3-6 14th Annual ER&L Conference, Austin, TX #erl19
4-6 Designing for Digital, Austin, TX + Online #d4d19
20-21 Library Technology Conference 2019, St. Paul, MN #LTC2019
26-28 Computers in Libraries 2019, Arlington, VA #CILDC
May
17 UNT Open Access Symposium 2019, Dallas, TX #UNTOA19
June
2-6 ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2019, Urbana-Champaign, IL #JCDL2019
14-18 SLA Annual Conference 2019, Cleveland, OH #SLA2019
20-25 ALA Annual Conference 2019, Washington, DC #ALAAC19
August
24-30 IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Athens, Greece #wlic2019
October
19-23 ASIS&T Annual Meeting 2019, Melbourne, Australia #ASIST19
November
TBA Charleston Conference, Charleston, SC #CHSConf2019
February 2020
25-29 PLA Conference 2020, Nashville, TN #PLA2020

For more comprehensive lists, see Douglas Hasty’s Library Conference Planner website.

2018 Library Conference Schedule

It’s a new year and we are looking forward to the 2018 annual library conferences.  The list below covers large library technology conferences as well as the major conferences where technology will be discussed.

February #hashtag
9-13 ALA Midwinter Meeting, Denver, CO #alamw18
13-16 Code4Lib 2018, Los Angeles, CA  #c4l18
March
4-7 13th Annual ER&L Conference, Austin, TX #erl18
5-7 Designing for Digital, Austin, TX  #d4d18
14-15 Library Technology Conference 2018, St. Paul, MN #libtechconf
20-24 PLA Conference 2018, Philadelphia, PA #PLA2018
April
17-19 Computers in Libraries 2018, Arlington, VA #CILDC
June
3-6 Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2018, Fort Worth, TX #JCDL2018
3-6 UNT Open Access Symposium 2018, Fort Worth, TX #UNTOA18
9-13 SLA Annual Conference 2018, Baltimore, MD #SLA2018
21-26 ALA Annual Conference 2018, New Orleans, LA #ALAAC18
August
24-30 IFLA World Library and Information Congress, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia #wlic2018
November
5-9 Charleston Conference, Charleston, SC @chsconf
9-14 ASIS&T Annual Meeting 2018, Vancouver, Canada @asist_org

For more comprehensive lists, see Douglas Hasty’s Library Conference Planner website.

Library Technology at the ALA 2017 Annual Conference

ALA 2017 Annual Conference

The ALA 2017 Annual Conference is just one week away.  The conference covers a myriad of library topics and sorting through the program sessions to find the ones focused on library technology takes effort.  Let us do the work for you.

Here is our list of programs related to library technology.  You’ll find interest groups and sessions on data and metadata, makerspaces, UX, Linked Data, ILS and LMS, websites, mobile apps, emerging technologies, and more.  Committee meetings were not included.

For official descriptions, speakers, and final schedule, please check the conference Full Schedule page.
Continue reading “Library Technology at the ALA 2017 Annual Conference”

6 More Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs

Google ChromeA look at global browser market share data will show that Google’s Chrome browser commands more than half of the browser market (61.2% for April 2017, to be specific). The market share might be even higher among librarians (who have a choice at work). If you’re not a Google Chrome user, these additional six browser extensions might make you switch.

We previously posted 6 Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs.

If you’ve never considered browser extensions, they are plugins or small applications that add functionality to your browser.  Sometimes they work in the background (like Unpaywall, below) but usually they work when you click on a small icon that gets added to the browser’s toolbar.

Chrome browser extension icons

Google has a huge Chrome Web Store for browser extensions, most of them are free.  They offer help to install and manage extensions but for the most part, a single click will install an extension.  Sometimes additional configuration options are available.

Here are six more Chrome browser extensions every librarian needs.

Continue reading “6 More Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs”