Creating the 21st-Century Academic Library Book Series

Leading the 21st-Century Academic Library: Successful Strategies for Envisioning and Realizing Preferred Futures Enhancing Teaching and Learning in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Successful Innovations That Make a Difference Cutting-Edge Research in Developing the Library of the Future: New Paths for Building Future Services

A new professional book series for academic librarians has been published.  The volumes were edited by Bradford Lee Eden and contain the knowledge and experience of academic librarian contributors.  [Disclosure: I co-wrote a chapter but receive no royalties from the sale.]

The Creating the 21st-Century Academic Library series contains five titles so far:

  1. Leading the 21st-Century Academic Library: Successful Strategies for Envisioning and Realizing Preferred Futures
  2. Enhancing Teaching and Learning in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Successful Innovations That Make a Difference
  3. Cutting-Edge Research in Developing the Library of the Future: New Paths for Building Future Services
  4. Creating Research Infrastructures in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Conceiving, Funding, and Building New Facilities and Staff
  5. Partnerships and New Roles in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Collaborating, Embedding, and Cross-Training for the Future

The titles are available as ebooks and print books.

Creating Research Infrastructures in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Conceiving, Funding, and Building New Facilities and Staff Partnerships and New Roles in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Collaborating, Embedding, and Cross-Training for the Future

Consolidation of the Library Vendors

ProQuest EBSCO OCLC

With two recent announcements of mergers of well-known library vendors—ProQuest acquired Ex Libris and Bibliotheca bought 3M Library Systems—the number of independent library vendors is shrinking.

ProQuest is now a provider of research databases (ProQuest Central and others), ebooks (ebrary, EBL, and MyiLibrary), discovery tools (Summon and now Primo), link resolvers (Serials Solutions and now SFX), library management system (Alma and Intota), and print books (with the recent purchase of Coutts).

EBSCO is the next largest vendor in this shrinking field.  EBSCO offers research databases (EBSCOhost), ebooks (EBSCO eBooks and Audiobooks), a discovery tool (EBSCO Discovery Service), a link resolver (LinkSource), and print books (YBP Library Services).  EBSCO does not offer an ILS or LMS and one has to wonder if the company will go looking to acquire one.

OCLC is the third major competitor in the library services arena. OCLC does not provide content like ProQuest and EBSCO.  However, they offer a discovery tool (WorldCat) and a modern library management system (WorldShare Management Services).  OCLC also offers popular services such as a proxy service (EZproxy), interlibrary loan service (ILLiad), digital collection management tool (CONTENTdm), and a virtual reference system (QuestionPoint).

If your library is looking for a comprehensive library management / discovery service / link resolver solution, you now have three vendors.

Further Reading

American LibrariesProQuest to Acquire Ex Libris

Globes: ProQuest to buy Israeli co Ex Libris for $500m

Ithaka S+R: What Are the Larger Implications of ProQuest’s Acquisition of Ex Libris?

23 Mobile Things by NEFLIN

23 Mobile Things by NEFLIN

On January 12, 2015 the Northeast Florida Library Information Network (NEFLIN) posted the first mobile thing (app) in their “23 Mobile Things” program.  For the next six months NEFLIN introduced participants to one or more mobile apps each week. Participants learned about the app through text or videos, downloaded the app and experimented with it, and then answered a few questions about it.  NEFLIN awarded Apple or Google gift cards to those who completed all 23 things by June 30, 2015.

The series started with common social media apps such as Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and Instagram.  They moved on to audio apps such as Spotify and SoundCloud.  Of course, reading apps were covered including Flipboard, Goodreads, Google Play Books, and iBooks. Video editing, presentation, and even game apps were covered.

The official program has ended, but you can see the list of mobile apps and learn about each one.  Visit 23things.neflin.org/23-things.

NEFLIN’s 23 Mobile Things was based on the 23 Mobile Things course by Jan Holmquist, Mylee Joseph, and Kathryn Barwick.  That program was based on Helene Blowers’ 23 Things on Learning 2.0.

23 Mobile Things Icons

Do You Have an ORCID iD?

ORCIDDo you have an ORCID iD?  If you do research and publish your work, you should consider getting an ORCID iD. ORCID stands for Open Researcher and Contributor ID.

What is an ORCID?

ORCID can refer to the organization issuing the unique researcher identification as well as the identifier itself.  From the ORCID description:

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.

You can learn more from the ORCID Frequently Asked Questions page.

ORCID QR Code (James Day)Your ORCID iD is a unique 16-digit number (ex. 0000-0002-6374-9591) which points to a public profile (ex. orcid.org/0000-0002-6374-9591). The ORCID website can generate a QR Code which you can add to your publications and websites.  Your ORCID record can contain education, employment, and publication information much like a résumé or curriculum vitae.

Major research database vendors support ORCID iDs and integrate ORCID into their systems.

Elsevier supports ORCID and has a Scopus to ORCID feature that adds your Scopus ID to your ORCID record.  Elsevier’s manuscript submission system accepts an ORCID when submitting manuscripts for publication.  Elsevier plans to pass it along as metadata to CrossRef.

Using an API, ProQuest integrates the ORCID into its Pivot application.  Pivot users can link their profile in Pivot to their ORCID record.

Thomson Reuters, through its Converis research information system offers, supports ORCID throughout the entire research lifecycle from assigning ORCID iDs to importing publications from other online sources using the ORCID iDs.  Their ResearcherID is ORCID compliant.

Register for an ORCID iD at orcid.org/register.

Follow the ORCID Organization on Twitter at @ORCID_Org.