Technology Podcasts for Librarians

Just in the past few months several new technology podcasts have launched which are useful for any librarian interested in technology.  A few address library technology topics specifically, while others cover general technology that has relevance to libraries.

Here are some of the best technology podcasts for librarians.

Library Technology


Library 20/20: A Podcast about the Future of Libraries

Library 20/20: A Podcast about the Future of LibrariesFollow along with Charlie Bennett as he talks through the renovation and modernization of the Georgia Tech Library as an example of the future of libraries, especially with the use of technology.

The Library Pros

The Library ProsThis new podcast (since March) is produced by Chris and Bob, a technology librarian and an “Information Technology professional” who cover new technology applicable to public libraries.

LibUX

LibUXCovering all aspects of the library user experience.  Amanda and Michael “talk design, development, and the user experience in libraries and the higher-ed web” with many guest contributors.

General Technology

TWiT Bits

TWiT BitsThese short podcasts present highlights from Leo Laporte’s longer This Week in Tech (TWiT) episodes at twit.tv.  TWiT keeps you up-to-date with all technology from computers to gadgets to the Web.  Topics also cover technology culture and politics.

W3 Radio

W3 RadioCurated and presented by librarian Michael Schofield, this brand-new podcast covers the week in Web technology in under ten minutes.

Library Technology at the ALA 2016 Annual Conference

ALA 2016 Annual Conference

The ALA 2016 Annual Conference is just about a month away.  The conference covers a myriad of library topics and sorting through the program sessions to find the ones focused on library technology takes effort.  Let us do the work for you.

Here is our list programs related to library technology.  You find interest groups and sessions on data and metadata, makerspaces, UX, Linked Data, ILS and LMS, websites, mobile apps, emerging technologies, and more. Committee meeting were not included.

For official descriptions, speakers, and final schedule, please check the conference Full Schedule page.

Continue reading “Library Technology at the ALA 2016 Annual Conference”

Library Communities on Slack

Slack

You may have heard of Slack, perhaps mentioned on social media, but unless you’re a technical librarian, you’re probably not using it. Yet.  There currently are just a few librarian communities on Slack but it seems to be a welcome alternative to social media groups for the technical savvy librarians.

Slack was created to allow private teams to collaborate.  So you won’t find an index or search engine on the Slack website to find teams.  However, many coder communities have sprung up which are more open in nature.  You can use third-party sites to find them. We will maintain a list of them as they are created.

With all Slack sites, you’ll need to request access.

Slack LibUx ChannelsSlack team sites are divided into custom channels. Channels are topic threads. Each site comes with a #general and a #random channel by default.

In addition to normal textual messages, you can drag-and-drop in files, documents, spreadsheets, PDFs, and links.  You can react to others and set notifications.

Of course, Slack allows you to search the entire archives.

Slack also allows members to chat via direct messages.

The free version of Slack allows for unlimited members but a limit of 10,000 messages (with older ones disappearing from view and search).

Get the Slack app for Android and Apple devices.

Library Communities

code4lib

Even though code4lib has its own website with IRC and a wiki, much daily conversation takes place in its Slack site.  code4lib has over 500 users and 24 channels including the code4lib IRC channel.

code4lib can be found at code4lib.slack.com.
Request access at goo.gl/forms/p9Ayz93DgG.

Datalibrarians of Florida

As you can tell by the name, this Slack community is aimed at technical librarians in Florida.

Datalibrarians of Florida can be found at fladatalibs.slack.com.
Request access in the Florida Databrarians Facebook group.

LibApps

The LibApps Slack site was started recently as an alternative to the official Springshare Lounge.  It has over 150 members and 16 channels covering all Springshare apps and more.

LibApps can be found at libapps.slack.com.
Request access in the “Slack Team for LibApps” thread in the Under the Hood group in the Springshare Lounge.

LibTech

The LibTech Slack site is brand new!  It is less technical than code4lib and broader than LibUX, covering all library technology topics.  If you want to learn what Slack is about, come join this group as a founding member.  Help us reach critical mass and suggest some appropriate channels.

LibTech can be found at librarytech.slack.com.
Request access at erau.libsurveys.com/LibTech.

LibUX

The LibUX site is perhaps the most active of the library Slack communities with over 200 members discussing library user experience topics in 13 channels.

LibUX can be found at libraryux.slack.com.
Request access at libux.herokuapp.com.

Check for new additions on our Social Media Resources for Librarians page.

Electronic Resources on Social Media

Social Media Icons

Follow or friend your favorite electronic resource websites on three major social networking sites: Facebook, Google+, and Twitter.  The database vendors often use these outlets to give updates, offer free access trials, and announce downtime.

Facebook

Google+

Twitter

If we are missing one of your favorites, please let us know in the comment section.

23 Mobile Things by NEFLIN

23 Mobile Things by NEFLIN

On January 12, 2015 the Northeast Florida Library Information Network (NEFLIN) posted the first mobile thing (app) in their “23 Mobile Things” program.  For the next six months NEFLIN introduced participants to one or more mobile apps each week. Participants learned about the app through text or videos, downloaded the app and experimented with it, and then answered a few questions about it.  NEFLIN awarded Apple or Google gift cards to those who completed all 23 things by June 30, 2015.

The series started with common social media apps such as Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and Instagram.  They moved on to audio apps such as Spotify and SoundCloud.  Of course, reading apps were covered including Flipboard, Goodreads, Google Play Books, and iBooks. Video editing, presentation, and even game apps were covered.

The official program has ended, but you can see the list of mobile apps and learn about each one.  Visit 23things.neflin.org/23-things.

NEFLIN’s 23 Mobile Things was based on the 23 Mobile Things course by Jan Holmquist, Mylee Joseph, and Kathryn Barwick.  That program was based on Helene Blowers’ 23 Things on Learning 2.0.

23 Mobile Things Icons