Open Access from Publishers and Databases

Open Access LogoThe movement toward open access databases and journals hasn’t been lost on traditional publishers and database vendors.

One problem for startup open access journals is their lack of reputation and prestige due to their inherent newness.  They have no established reputation or credibility except that of the sponsoring organization: an academic society, institution, or university.  Established traditional publishers can somewhat overcome this problem by lending their name, reputation, and credibility to their journals.

More and more traditional publishers are experimenting with the open access journal publishing model.  Very few journals are converted from the traditional subscription model to open access, most are new journals developed as open access from the start.

Generally, the publishers are separating their open access journals from their subscription journals and creating new databases to aggregate and provide access to them.  Database vendors may integrate subscription and open access journals with a search filter for open access titles.

Here are some major publishers and databases and their current open access offerings.

Elsevier

ElsevierGiant academic publishing company Elsevier offers over 550 peer-reviews open access journals published under the gold open access model.  In addition, Elsevier provides free access to archived material in more than 100 paid Elsevier journals.

See Elsevier Open Access Journals.

JSTOR

JSTORJSTOR, a database of journals and ebooks, offers over 500 open access ebooks with no restrictions on chapter downloading or printing.  Librarians can access free MARC records for these titles.

See about.jstor.org/open-access.

ProQuest

PQDT OpenProQuest doesn’t generally support open access.  It does offer one service, called PQDT Open, providing open access dissertations and theses.  Graduate students pay a one-time fee of $95 through the Open Access Publishing PLUS service.

See and search PQDT Open.

SAGE Open

SAGE OpenSAGE Open is a peer-reviewed open access journal from SAGE Publications.  Coverage spans “the full extent of the social and behavioral sciences and the humanities”. The publishing fee is $395.

See sgo.sagepub.com.

SpringerOpen

SpringerOpenSpringerOpen contains “200+ peer-reviewed fully open access journals” and an interdisciplinary open access journal titled SpringerPlus.  Most of the journals are indexed in Scopus and some SpringerOpen titles are searchable in Web of Science.

Authors pay “an article-processing charge (APC)” to get articles published in SpringerOpen.

See www.springeropen.com/journals.

Wiley Open Access

Wiley Open AccessWiley Open access offers 80+ open access journals.  It is a subset of Wiley Online Library.  Journal articles are accessible at PubMed Central.

Wiley also offers the partially-open access platform OnlineOpen with over 1,300 journals with a mix of pay and OA articles.

Wiley charges an Article Publication Charge (typically $800-$2,500) to authors or their institutions.  Authors can choose the type of Creative Commons license to publish under.

See www.wileyopenaccess.com.

Library Technology at the ALA 2017 Annual Conference

ALA 2017 Annual Conference

The ALA 2017 Annual Conference is just one week away.  The conference covers a myriad of library topics and sorting through the program sessions to find the ones focused on library technology takes effort.  Let us do the work for you.

Here is our list of programs related to library technology.  You’ll find interest groups and sessions on data and metadata, makerspaces, UX, Linked Data, ILS and LMS, websites, mobile apps, emerging technologies, and more.  Committee meetings were not included.

For official descriptions, speakers, and final schedule, please check the conference Full Schedule page.
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6 More Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs

Google ChromeA look at global browser market share data will show that Google’s Chrome browser commands more than half of the browser market (61.2% for April 2017, to be specific). The market share might be even higher among librarians (who have a choice at work). If you’re not a Google Chrome user, these additional six browser extensions might make you switch.

We previously posted 6 Chrome Browser Extensions Every Librarian Needs.

If you’ve never considered browser extensions, they are plugins or small applications that add functionality to your browser.  Sometimes they work in the background (like Unpaywall, below) but usually they work when you click on a small icon that gets added to the browser’s toolbar.

Chrome browser extension icons

Google has a huge Chrome Web Store for browser extensions, most of them are free.  They offer help to install and manage extensions but for the most part, a single click will install an extension.  Sometimes additional configuration options are available.

Here are six more Chrome browser extensions every librarian needs.

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OAI-PMH: Basics and Resources

Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) is a set of specifications for making structured open repository metadata accessible to other service providers issuing requests.

Why learn about OAI-PMH?

Taking advantage of repositories (data providers) and services (service providers) that offer metadata using OAI-PMH will allow your resources better visibility and access.  For example, many discovery services (the “harvester”) use OAI-PMH metadata for indexing open access institutional repository articles.

The Basics

Open Archives InitiativeOpen Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) specifies how metadata is structured and presented for ingestion by external services, usually on the Internet.  OAI-PMH metadata is encoded in extensible markup language (XML) format.  OAI-PMH records are harvested using HTTP requests.

OAI-PMH is a project of the Open Archives Initiative.

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Support Open Access Resources

Open Access LogoWe continue our celebration of Open Access Week.

While open access repositories and journals are free for end users, they do cost money to set up and maintain.  Forward-thinking libraries are beginning to allocate funds to support open access resources.

Here are some open access resources you should consider supporting.

BioMed Central

BioMed CentralBioMed Central contains over 290 peer-reviewed journals in Biology, Clinical Medicine, and Health.  Your library can get an institutional membership to manage Article Processing Charges (APCs).

Knowledge Unlatched

Knowledge UnlatchedKnowledge Unlatched creates packages of scholarly books in the humanities and social studies which are “unlatched” to become open access ebooks through membership contributions.  The first two rounds allowed the release of over 100 titles, made available for free via the HathiTrust Digital Library and OAPEN.  The pledging period for the next collection, KU Select 2016, runs through January 31, 2017.

Open Library

Open LibraryOpen Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive with “one web page for every book” ever published.  Users can read public domain “classic books” for free or borrow up to five titles for two weeks each.  Users can contribute by adding books or editing records. Sign up for a personal account or register your library to provide in-library loans for users on your library network.

Open Library of Humanities

Open Library of HumanitiesThe Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a UK-based open access publishing platform for scholarly peer-reviewed articles.  The OLH charges no author fees, but is “funded by an international consortium of libraries” along with grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.  Annual fees range from $534 to $1,600 based on institution size.  US libraries can join through LYRASIS at lyrasis.openlibhums.org.

PLOS

PLOSAdd PLOS ONE (and other PLOS publications) to your library’s databases list and activate PLOS ONE in your discovery service.  There are several ways you can get involved.  You and your institution’s faculty can publish in PLOS.  Your library can become an institutional member to handle Article Processing Charges (APCs) for your faculty.  Or you can simply donate to PLOS.  See www.plos.org/get-involved.